Wednesday, January 4, 2017

clean out of time




Looking at old photos while a little gray bird at the window looks at me. And of course, I'm thinking about the Rio Tan business I drove by this morning.

(This is my mind, as you know. Little child, gray bird, Rio Tan.)

How does the Rio Tan work here in Northeast Pennsylvania? Maybe D. Trump come for his unique shade of orange, but not likely. Surely he has a personal sprayer in his ivory tower. 


Mind: Little child, gray bird, Rio Tan, D. Trump? Help me.

It pains me to think of DT for more than 3 seconds, too long. Better to redirect this mind to Mom's meditation book which I read to Michael over our coffee and tea, both of us sighing at the end. Perhaps you'll find some sustenance here too?

Take what you need, leave the rest. 🌠

Faith is not, contrary to the usual ideas, something that turns out to be right or wrong, like a gambler's bet; it's an act, an intention, a project, something that makes you, in leaping into the future, go so far, far, far ahead that you shoot clean out of time and right into Eternity, which is not the end of time or a whole lot of time or unending time, but timelessness, that old Eternal Now. - Joanna Russ

Isn't it amazing how some people contrive to live in the present? They seem not to worry about the future; they seem not to regret the past. "Two days I can't do anything about," runs the saying, "yesterday and tomorrow,"

We love to fantasize about the past and the future: What if Napolean had died in infancy? Where would I travel in a time machine? But we get into trouble when we forget that "the past" and "the future" are inventions; the only reality is the present. Yes, past events contribute to our now; yes, the present will help determine the future. But we can't do anything about them; they are out of our reach. 


It seems, oddly enough, that it's the people with a strong faith who are best able to live in the present moment. Enjoyment of the present; care for the quality of life; these are a kind of reverence, a kind of faith in life itself. The present is valuable, this faith tells us: it is all we have.


Let me swim in the present, reverential and unafraid. 

Let me be sustained by the water of life.

xo b










let me be sustained















Looking at old photos while a little gray bird at the window is looking at me and thinking about the Rio Tan business I passed near my doctor's office.

(This is my mind, as you know. Little child, gray bird, Rio Tan.) 

How does a Rio Tan works here in Northeast Pennsylvania? Maybe this is where D. Trump comes for his unique shade of orange, but not likely. Surely he has a personal sprayer in his ivory tower. I can't bear to think of him for more than 3 seconds, that's way too long, so I'll redirect my mind to today's reading from Mom's meditation book. I read it to Michael over coffee and tea, both of us sighing at the end. We'd been soothed. Perhaps you'll find some sustenance too. Take what you need, leave the rest. 🌠

Faith is not, contrary to the usual ideas, something that turns out to be right or wrong, like a gambler's bet; it's an act, an intention, a project, something that makes you, in leaping into the future, go so far, far, far ahead that you shoot clean out of time and right into Eternity, which is not the end of time or a whole lot of time or unending time, but timelessness, that old Eternal Now. - Joanna Russ

Isn't it amazing how some people contrive to live in the present? They seem not to worry about the future; they seem not to regret the past. "Two days I can't do anything about," runs the saying, "yesterday and tomorrow,"

We love to fantasize about the past and the future: What if Napolean had died in infancy? Where would I travel in a time machine? But we get into trouble when we forget that "the past" and "the future" are inventions; the only reality is the present. Yes, past events contribute to our now; yes, the present will help determine the future. But we can't do anything about them; they are out of our reach. 

It seems, oddly enough, that it's the people with a strong faith who are best able to live in the present moment. Enjoyment of the present; care for the quality of life; these are a kind of reverence, a kind of faith in life itself. The present is valuable, this faith tells us: it is all we have.

Let me swim in the present, reverential and unafraid. 
Let me be sustained by the water of life.












xo b 

Sunday, January 1, 2017

Your Never Lying Gut






















"If something feels really good for you, you might want to do it. If something feels really horrible, you might want to consider not doing it." - Martha Beck

My wish for all of us this new year, along with a basket full of other wishes and prayers, is to follow this simple advice. You don't need a special certification or degree, be of a certain age, race, religion, gender, be thin, round, or know how to tweet. This practice is a few minutes of your precious life to check in with your never lying gut to see how you feel when invitations, experiences, relationships, job offers, or you think you need a cat knocks on your door. Pause, ask,

How does this feel right now? 

Then, have at it - one way or the other.

Happy New Year, Lovelies!

May you blossom and bloom in your own right timing, always. 🌀

with love and gratitude,
  xo b